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Homiletics: The Name Isaiah Means "Yahweh Saves"
(C. Hammond)

Author's Bias: Interpretation: conservative
Inclination: dispensational
Seminary: none

Homiletics can serve as a very helpful technique in understanding a biblical passage without losing its context, and how that passage is relevant to our lives. When homiletics is done over consecutive chapters, one may see themes and logical progressions that may not be appreciated when studying a smaller passage.

This is an example of how one can conduct a study exegetically without the risk of eisegesis. While this article will present the resulting aim and application from the homiletics of each chapter, you can see the steps involved with homiletics which can be printed for your own personal study and lesson.

Today’s study will be in Isaiah 41 through 48. Isaiah, son of Amoz, was a prophet in Judah around 700 B.C. He wrote more than any other prophet, and was trying to bring the people of Judah back into a covenantal relationship with God. Mindful of the Mosaic Covenant and its obligations, he confronts his generation of their sins. Aware of the Abrahamic Covenant, he attempts to comfort future generations, who were going to be in exile, that God would restore them to their land and fulfill His promises of blessings.

One sin that Hebrews continually had problems with was idolatry. In the Old Testament, an idol was a physical image or representation that was considered divine and worthy of worship. The Bible records many examples of this (Gen 31:19-35; Ex 32:1-10; 2 Ki 18:4).

Based on the Ten Commandments (Ex 20-4-5), biblical religion is an "imageless" worship.

In the New Testament, the apostle Paul broadens the definition of idolatry when he equates "immorality" (fornication), "impurity" (perversion), "passion" (uncontrollable lust), "evil desire" (illicit cravings) and "greed" (covetousness) with idolatry (Col 3:5). Paul saw idolatry when human beings sought to satisfy the evil desires of their human nature instead of putting on the new self who was being renewed to a true knowledge according to the image of the One who created him (Col 3:10).

In this context, the prophet Isaiah denounces idolatry.

Chapter Aim: What is the compelling motive of this passage that would cause you to change your life?
41
Homiletics
Cause my audience to know that it is God who has created and called you, so turn from your worthless idols and fear the Lord!
42
Homiletics
Cause my audience to accept the anointed servant, Jesus Christ, rejoice in His glory and be obedient to His ways.
43
Homiletics
Cause my audience to understand the mercy and redemption of God before it is too late.
44
Homiletics
Cause my audience to pursue the one true God rather than chase after worthless idols.
45
Homiletics
Cause my audience to understand the righteousness and sovereignty of God - do not contend with His plans.
46
Homiletics
Cause my audience to know personally the awesome, redeeming power of God.
47
Homiletics
Cause my audience to carefully examine their lives and turn away from any unrighteousness.
48
Homiletics
Cause my audience to listen carefully to God's Word, follow His direction and avoid giving His glory to others.
Chapter Applications: Try to write at least one application for each of your divisions.
41

Homiletics
1. By whom have you been created?

2. Who or what do you fear more than you fear the Lord?

3. What "enemies" has God helped you to overcome in your life?

4. What are some of the ways that God has provided for you?

5. What idols do you cling to and what have they ever done for you?
42

Homiletics
1. Have you accepted or rejected God’s anointed servant, Jesus Christ?

2. What idols have you been worshiping other than God?

3. Is your worship of God with your whole mind, body and spirit, or are you only offering "token" worship before the Lord?

4. In what areas of your life are you still disobeying God’s law?
43

Homiletics
1. Who do you believe has created you and for what purpose?

2. Do you believe there is any other Savior other than Jesus Christ?

3. How have you praised and worshipped God this week?

4. By what actions or deeds may you have rejected God recently?
44

Homiletics
1. How should knowing that God goes before you change the way you live?

2. Who or what are you pursuing more than you pursue God?

3. Can you truly say that you serve the one true God with all your heart?

4. In what ways has God restored your life?
45

Homiletics
1. For what purpose has God raised you up?

2. How has the sovereign hand of God been revealed in your life?

3. In what ways are you futility trying to argue with God?

4. How can you be found righteous in the eyes of God?
46

Homiletics
1. Do you personally know the awesome, redeeming power of God?
47

Homiletics
1. What sin in your life is exposed when compared to the righteousness of Christ?

2. How do you plan to repent of your sin?

3. Who do you seek for counsel, "wise" men of the world, or humble servants of God?

4. Who or what is the biggest influence in your life? Is it a righteous influence?
48

Homiletics
1. How do you listen for God's leading in your life?

2. Who have you glorified this week when the glory really belonged to God?

3. What teachings in God's Word have you failed to obey?

4. Can you honestly say that you thirst for God and His Word? If not, how can you correct this in your life?

Charles Hammond's personal note: I was born and raised in Kirkland, WA, where my family attended a liberal, protestant church on a semi-regular basis. This church taught a social gospel filled with references about loving others, but never talked about sin or salvation. We were taught that if you lived an honest life trying to help others, you would go to Heaven. I was 19 and a Sophomore at Oregon State University when two young men asked if they could join me at my table in the campus cafeteria. They quickly brought the conversation around to God and asked me if I had a personal relationship with God. Although I believed there was a God, I knew I didn't have a personal relationship. They proceeded to tell me that as a sinner (I knew I had sinned!) my relationship with God was broken. They explained how Jesus Christ had shed his blood and died on the cross so that all who ask Him might be forgiven and receive eternal life. I knew immediately that I wanted this forgiveness and I wanted to know for sure that I had eternal life. I prayed with these men right in the middle of the cafeteria and asked Jesus Christ to come into my life, to forgive my sins, and to give me the gift of eternal life. Jesus became my Savior and Lord at that very moment! My life will never again be the same.

I encourage all who read this to ask themselves if they truly know Jesus Christ as their Savior and Lord. You can receive Him just as I received Him by a simple prayer. If you have never done this, please take a moment and pray. Invite Jesus to enter your life, forgive your sins and give you the gift of eternal life. It will be the greatest decision you have ever made.

Charles Hammond was born and raised in Kirkland, WA. He attended Oregon State University and received a BS degree in Business Administration. He has worked in the Seattle area since 1971. Since 1987, he has been a financial advisor and a partner in Cornerstone Advisors, Inc. in Bellevue. He served as a Teaching Leader in Bible Study Fellowship for 10 years, and has been an Elder at Antioch Bible Church in Kirkland, WA since 1988. He also sings in the United Voices of Antioch choir and leads a men's Bible Study group in his home.

References:

1. Brand C, Draper C and England A, eds., Holman Illustrated Bible Dictionary, Nashville: Holman Bible Publishers, (1998).


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